Yellowstone National Park NEWS

 
nps.gov - Yellowstone National Park - News Releases
News releases from Yellowstone National Park.
  • Yellowstone makes substantial progress to reduce nonnative lake trout and recover native cutthroat trout
    The annual removal of nonnative lake trout from Yellowstone Lake recently concluded and the multiyear effort points to a declining population. Lake trout are removed in an effort to preserve the native cutthroat trout population, the largest remaining concentration of inland cutthroat trout in existence. https://www.nps.gov/yell/learn/news/19053.htm
  • Study shows Yellowstone bison have positive effects on the landscape
    Biologists from the National Park Service, U.S. Geological Survey, and the Universities of Wyoming and Montana published findings of a 10-year study about bison migration and grazing in Yellowstone National Park in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences this week. https://www.nps.gov/yell/learn/news/19052.htm
  • Yellowstone seeks comments on a proposal to provide Wi-Fi for park visitors and employees
    The National Park Service seeks public comment on a proposal to install indoor Wi-Fi networks and associated equipment throughout Yellowstone National Park’s developed areas for the benefit of park visitors and employees. https://www.nps.gov/yell/learn/news/19051.htm
  • Yellowstone visitation statistics for October 2019
    Yellowstone hosted 170,038 visits in October 2019. This is a 22% decrease from October 2018. So far in 2019, the park has hosted 3,977,852 visits, down 2.5% from the same period last year. Due to snow throughout the month, some entrance stations and park roads were temporarily closed. These closures likely contributed to the decrease in visitation. https://www.nps.gov/yell/learn/news/19050.htm
  • Yellowstone releases 2018 Visitor Use Survey Study
    A peer-reviewed report summarizing the results of Yellowstone’s 2018 Visitor Use Study is available online today. The National Park Service contracted Otak Inc., RRC Associates, and The University of Montana Institute for Tourism Recreation Research to conduct the study to help better understand how visitors experience the park in real time, across the summer season, and across different parts of the park. More than 4,000 people responded to the surveys, one of the largest in the history of the National Park Service. https://www.nps.gov/yell/learn/news/19049.htm